Let's talk Latin America

Helen Brown

Ana Vallejo’s photography humanises Bogotá’s illegal settlements

Ana Vallejo is a Colombian photographer based in Bogotá. Her project, Entre Nubes, focuses on San Germán, a makeshift neighbourhood in a National Park on the outskirts of Bogotá, where people internally displaced from various conflicts around Colombia have settled after finding themselves unable to find housing in the capital. BristoLatino’s editor-in-chief, Helen Brown, interviewed Ana […]

ART FOCUS: JUAN RULFO PHOTOGRAPHY

Juan Rulfo was one of the most important Mexican authors of the 20th century, despite publishing only three books. BristoLatino’s editor-in-chief Helen Brown looks at his lesser-known career as a photographer, documenting the people, landscape and architecture of rural Mexico and Mexico City.   Juan Rulfo was born in 1917 in Jalisco, and in the early years of […]

The true story behind the missing 43 students: Anabel Hernández in conversation

At a talk organised by English PEN at the Free Word Centre in London, English journalist Gaby wood spoke with Mexican investigative reporter Anabel Hernández about the newly released English translation of her book, The True Story Behind the Missing 43 Students. Hernández discussed her research into this unsolved mystery, and the evidence she found […]

Raindance Film Festival’s Damn Kids tells the story of Chile’s desaparecidos

Raindance Film Festival’s Damn Kids (Cabros de mierda) tells the story of Gladys, a secret member of a group of revolutionary dissidents, and her family in a working class neighbourhood in Santiago, Chile, during Augusto Pinochet’s right-wing dictatorship. A North-American missionary, Samuel, comes to live with Gladys, and soon discovers the brutality of Pinochet’s military dictatorship […]

Beatriz Gonzalez: the Colombian Pop Art history painter

Beatriz González is a painter, sculptor and art historian who is lauded as one of the first modern Colombian artists. Her work undeniably has the same energy as Pop Art, questioning the divides between high and low art by taking inspiration from tabloid articles, recreating European classical paintings with an eccentric colour palette, and using […]

This month we’re reading….The Book of Emma Reyes

Every month, we tell you which Latin American writings we are reading. Taking many different forms and featuring writers stretching the whole of the South, Central and North America, we bring to you a wide selection of the modern works that are stirring literary interests. This month, Theatre Editor Helen Brown is taken with Emma Reyes’ autobiographical […]

Revolutionising Brazilian design from the periphery

Adélia Borges is a Brazilian journalist, curator and lecturer, who specialises in design. She celebrates initiatives that capture the social meaning of design, and appreciate and represent the broader scope of Brazilian society. Borges encourages uniting traditional Brazilian craftsmen with professional designers, marrying artisanship with mass production and spreading economic benefit from the cities to […]

Juan De la Cruz’s photography captures the spirit of Mexico

BristoLatino’s Helen Brown talks festivals, life experience and spirituality in photography with Juan De La Cruz, award-winning Mexican photographer. Juan De la Cruz is a photographer living in Veracruz, Mexico, who gained recognition as one of the six winners of the Latin American Fotografía award. His submission was part of a project called ‘The Labyrinth’, which explored […]

Fairy Tales and Social Critique in Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water

Hailed as a return to his Gothic cinematic roots, Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water has already started to garner acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic. Bristolatino’s Helen Brown takes us through a closer look at the allegorical meanings hidden in the film. Guillermo del Toro’s new film The Shape of Water features an amphibian humanoid […]